When I Consider How My Life Is Spent (Milton)

by John Milton (1608-1674)

When I consider how my light is spent
Ere half my days in this dark world and wide,
And that one talent which is death to hide
Lodg’d with me useless, though my soul more bent
To serve therewith my Maker, and present
My true account, lest he returning chide;
“Doth God exact day-labour, light denied?”
I fondly ask. But Patience to prevent
That murmur, soon replies: “God doth not need
Either man’s work or his own gifts; who best
Bear his mild yoke, they serve him best. His state
Is kingly. Thousands at his bidding speed
And post o’er land and ocean without rest:
They also serve who only stand and wait.”

 

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Challenge Accepted (curated)

Hello Friends, Yesterday I took to Twitter and asked my followers to give me just one word and I will attempt to write a poem that includes said word. I have been given a lot of great words to work with so far. As of tomorrow, I shall be attempting to write one poem per […]

via Poetry Challenge — Sara in LaLaLand

After seeing this post of Sara’s, I decided to go over to Facebook and pose the same query to my friends, asking them for one-word writing prompts. After all, what better way is there to help our friends connect with our writing than to give them a role in the creative process? The poems I write from these prompts will be featured on Thursdays.

10-line Poem Challenge #14: Brady’s Touch

This past week two people have tried their own hand at writing a Trianglet. Do stop by their blogs and take a look….

When you have finished reading the poems linked above, be sure to come back here to learn about a new decastich, Brady’s Touch.


Brady’s Touch is a decastich (10-line poem) created by Maryann Merryweather-Travis on November 2006, in honor of Allen Brady.

  • It is made of 2 quintets (5-line stanzas) with a specific rhyme and syllabic count.
  • Line length: Each stanza follows the same pattern of 9-9-8-8-2 syllables.
  • Rhyme scheme: abxcd abxcd
  • Thus the second stanza is an exact replica of the first stanza in terms of line length and rhyme. The poem really has a nice sound, with the rhyming sounds being so far apart from each other.

Continue reading “10-line Poem Challenge #14: Brady’s Touch”

Of Knees and Hugs

“I’ll come, but I won’t give any hugs because I have a cold.”
“Then I won’t look for one.”
Your response struck me as funny
Since I wasn’t in the habit of hugging you
My hugs were for the seniors for whom we sang.

After the meeting we talked more about hugs
And you told me what your Nanny used to say:
“Every family needs knee-slapping, knee-bending, and knee-bowing.”
Laughter. Discipline. Prayer.
“Your Nanny was a wise lady.”
Who could have guessed the best of all friendships
Would be sparked by talk of knees and hugs?

 

Copyright © 2018 Abigail Gronway – All Rights Reserved

Home

Home
My tam
On the bar
I rest content
Happy anywhere
Because you are there
For I know that
Where you are
I am
Home

 

Copyright © 2018 Abigail Gronway – All Rights Reserved

Scansion:
Trianglet = a decastich in 1 stanza with syllabic length: 1-2-3-4-5-5-4-3-2-1
Rhyme scheme: AbcxddxcbA
The first and last lines are identical.

 

Count Your Blessings

Why worry? Why ruminate

On what could have been,

When we can celebrate the beauty and the bounty of all that we behold.

 

With fragile threads we weave our stories

Try to fasten our futures on to what we hold dear

We take so much for granted, and we often fear

 

The void, the loss, the loneliness, the finite ending.

We should instead let our spirits soar and hold this beautiful moment

In our memory for eternity.

 

Read more via Count your blessings… by Alison Hankinson of aspoonfulofsugar337

10-line Poem Challenge #13: Trianglet

It has been six weeks since my last decastich tutorial. But after a much-needed break from writing, I am back in the saddle and ready to resume this journey through the various 10-line poetic forms. What about you? Are you ready to study them with me? Great! Then let’s get started.

The Trianglet was created by Mina M. Sutherland.

  • It is a decastich written in one stanza.
  • The second half of the poem is a reflection of the first half in both its rhyme and its syllabic pattern.
  • The lines have a syllabic pattern of: 1-2-3-4-5-5-4-3-2-1.
  • The rhyme scheme is: AbcxddxcbA.
  • The poem begins and ends with the same one-syllable word (lines 1 & 10).

Continue reading “10-line Poem Challenge #13: Trianglet”

Four Hours

How ever did we manage
To text for four hours
While avoiding the one thing
We most wanted to say?
This exercise of ours has a purpose:
In learning to wait,
I’ve come to know you well,
And you know me.
For four hours we talked
About God, health, work, and weather…
And all we heard was
“I love you.”

 

Copyright © 2018 Abigail Gronway – All Rights Reserved

Hallowed Reunion

Eagerly he came to her as soon as she arrived.
A knock.
An open door.
And two pairs of longing eyes at once grew misty.
The warmth in their long embrace
Erased both winter winds and
The months and miles of separation.

Arm in arm they sat
And talked freely of their past, present,
And future….
When words were spent,
Four wandering hands turned up the heat—
But only so far.
Such passion never met with such restraint!
For the time had not yet come to let the fire burn hot.
Their friendship still needs time to grow
Apart from passion’s glow.
Would anyone believe the scene,
If perchance they could have seen
These two dear friends so much in love
Yet willing to defer their pleasure
To please their loving Father?

“Some things are more important than the moment we are living in.”
Life has taught these unwed soul mates
How to love
And how to wait….
Waiting is the hallmark of their friendship.

“There is a fire.
Let’s be careful not to let it burn too bright.”
With one more hug he quickly said good night.

 
Copyright © 2018 Abigail Gronway – All Rights Reserved

Also shared at dVerse Poet’s Pub ~ Open Link Night